Drawing on their in-depth knowledge of the fundaments of physics and their advanced modelling skills, physics engineers design innovative solutions in highly varied contexts, ranging from fundamental scientific research to high-tech industrial applications, in fields as diverse as nuclear imaging, medical engineering, quantum engineering, laser physics and photonics. This profession requires solid expertise in microscopic physics, entailing the study of the quantum world and its uses in atomic, molecular, nuclear and solid state physics, and in the optical field.

Programme

The engineering physics course is focused on developing a sophisticated understanding of the physical phenomena on which cutting-edge technologies are based. Applied mathematics are a second vital area of teaching. In the first year of the Master’s programme, introductory courses in atomic and nuclear physics are offered alongside more applied courses such as laser physics, acoustics and nuclear reactor physics. A project is also completed in a company or lab. The second year of the Master’s programme offers students a choice between five options (material physics, photonics, nuclear engineering, radiation protection and biomedical imaging). Students also complete an internship in industry and/or a free choice of courses. The Master’s thesis also provides an introduction to experimental or theoretical research in a wide range of fields. The nuclear engineering course is unique to the ULB and highly sought after in both Belgium and abroad.

Career prospects

The course is focused on developing a sophisticated understanding of the physical phenomena on which cutting-edge technologies are based in order to appropriate and improve them and, above all, innovate. Academic institutions and research centres are therefore a major source of job opportunities. The modelling abilities of physics engineers are in demand wherever physics and applied mathematics are found (telecommunications, medical techniques, environmental technologies, micro-electronics, etc.), as well as in the banking sector, the insurance sector and management consulting. Options may also be taken to allow specialisation in more specific sectors such as nuclear engineering.

Updated on May 21, 2019